..(home)/Beavertail/beavertail-online-plans/README.htm

  The Big Picture
These instructions assume you won't actually try to build anything before reading through the instructions at least once (you can skip part 5: the balsa-core instructions. That part is obsolete now).

If you find words sentances or paragraphs in the text of these instructions that don't make sense, please send me email to me and tell me about it. I do rely on subscribers to help keep the instructions up to date and coherent.

Before you do anything you need to make a large work table by placing 4 extra-straight 16' 2x4s over saw horses. Then you screw (drywall screws) particle board to the 2x4s. Now you've got a table to work on.


Materials Notes
First you scarf two 4x8 plywood (or honeycomb core) panels together to make a single 4x16' panel (that's an approx length, detailed instructions come later). And then you cut the 4x16' panel diagonally down the middle to make the two side panels. Then you scarf two more sheets to make a bottom panel.

Then you put visqueen over the work table and fiberglass the panels. You can pre-fiberglass both sides of the side panels. But you should only pre-fiberglass the inside surface of the bottom panel. I currently recomend 3.5oz or 4oz fabric for the side panels--10oz for the bottom panel. Then you layout the side panels with pencil marks at the right places (where to put temporary ribs). Note the layout marks go on top of fiberglass.

Then you cut out or make a few trapezoid shapes (from chip board or 1x6" boards). These trapezoids are essentially temporary boat ribs. Then you screw the side panels to the temporary ribs. Then you pull the front of the side panels together and screw them to the stem. Then you add the transom at the rear (still no bottom panel) and voila: it starts to look a lot like an (upside down) boat.

Then you add the bottom panel, flip the boat over, add gunwales, add seats, paint the boat and then go fishing. The instructions that follow have detailed discussions for each of the above steps. But it's important to get a big picture idea of the overall process before diving into it.